Seletar Dam: Singapore’s own little causeway

There are not many places you can fall in love with, but for me the Lower Seletar Dam is definitely one of them, not only because of its uniqueness as a mini-causeway linking Seletar to Yishun, but also because you have the beauty of the South China Sea on one side and Lower Seletar Reservoir on the other.

View of the lower seletar reservoir that runs to one side of the lower seletar dam

View of the lower seletar reservoir that runs to one side of the lower seletar dam

Like a mini-causeway, cars bypass seletar west link and into Yishun Ave 1

Like a mini-causeway, cars bypass seletar west link and into Yishun Ave 1

I remember heading here with a bunch of friends at night some years back, where we set up a mini-barbeque with an aluminum tray and had a couple of drinks under the stars, something many of us were not used to. As with any other night, a whole array of vehicles of all shapes and sizes were parked illegally alongside. Whether it was to fish, smoke, get frisky or simply relax, everyone came here for a different reason but appreciated the serenity of the area altogether.

It must have been years since I crossed that place again, but a chance encounter while cycling to Upper Seletar Reservoir earlier this year during the day, led me to put my brakes on and take the opportunity to sit down and admire the scenery.

Fisherman precariously head down the loose rocks to cast their lines into the South China Sea

Fisherman precariously head down the loose rocks to cast their lines into the South China Sea

The mangroves can be seen to your right

The mangroves can be seen to your right

On the side of the South China Sea, you could see anglers precariously heading down to the shore to cast their rods, while the flames from refineries across on Pasir Gudang continue to be visible even in daylight. Surviving mangroves flanks the banks of the sea, while stray dogs and the ever hard-working workers keep the area free from the litter leftover from the nightly revelries.

A cleaner hard at work keeping the seletar damn clean from late night revelries.

A cleaner hard at work keeping the seletar damn clean from late night revelries.

In contrast, the Lower Seletar Reservoir, which was opened in 1986, is an extreme calm water body that occupies a 45ha park that serves as a recreational haven for nearby residents.

Along its horizon you can see the Southbound trains from Kahtib heading towards Yio Chu Kang, while anything from Dragon boaters to kite-flyers, and the occasional aircraft heading to Seletar Airbase may also come into your line of sight.

In the distance you can probably see the South bound trains from Kahtib to Yio Chu Kang

In the distance you can probably see the South bound trains from Kahtib to Yio Chu Kang

Ironically while the Lower Seletar Dam serves as a time saver for vehicles, it also becomes an extension of time for people looking to take a break, as the environment and poor phone reception somehow encourages you to simply sit back and forget any worries at the back of your mind.

Cyclist often enjoy the path cause of it's long and even routes

Cyclist often enjoy the path cause of it’s long and even routes

Can't help but take my bike along either

Can’t help but take my bike along either

People there also seemed to smile a lot more, and even just cycling along the stretch, I must have said ‘Good Morning’ or simply smiled to at least 5 people including the park cleaner, though I can’t quite confirm if the grass-cutter felt exactly the same way.

Even the grass-cutters were busy on a Saturday

Even the grass-cutters were busy on a Saturday

You can never run away from rules in Singapore

You can never run away from rules in Singapore

Fishing near the floodgates

Fishing near the floodgates

5 comments

  1. Pingback: Daily SG: 27 Sep 2013 | The Singapore Daily

  2. Bill

    Not the South China Sea but the Straits of Johore!!

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